ghosts

8 Spooky Social Media Recommendations

Voices in the Attic began as a school group project at Algonquin College, between 5 students who all shared a general taste for the dark, disturbing, and macabre. Because of this, I like to think we’re all particularly good at finding the creepier places on the Internet. Of course, all the Voices up in the Attic have their own favourites, but I’d like to share with you just a few of mine.

Reddit is a particularly favourite haunt of mine, and was even before I actually liked horror. ‘Guilty pleasure’ is probably not quite right, though it was something I felt like I shouldn’t be doing, but just couldn’t help. After all, I would read through just a few stories, and then not sleep for a week. On this site, there are two threads in particular that I like to peruse:

Creepy Things Kids Say

Photo courtesy of darksouls1 via Pixabay

Photo courtesy of darksouls1 via Pixabay

“Creepy Things Kids Say” is a thread that is pretty much self-explanatory. It asks all the parents (or anyone that spends time around children) of Reddit to tell stories of the creepiest things their offspring have ever said or done. Some involve stories of children that seem to be recounting past lives, others are things that suggest certain parents have future serial killers on their hands, and others take a more paranormal turn. I’ve read so many that I couldn’t even begin to pick favourites (though there are an alarming number of children that talk to shadows in their closets), but I do highly recommend you check these out for yourself. Maybe don’t do what I did though, and read them while home alone, or just before bed. Then again, if you’re into the added level of terror, go for it!

Unfortunately, the thread is archived, so it’s no longer open to comments and contributions, but if you search around enough, new threads for the same subject are often popping up. And if you do have stories of your own, feel free to leave them in the comments section below this post!

Unexplained Paranormal Happenings

While this particular thread is also archived, there are several iterations of it, and much like “Creepy Things Kids Say”, they also pop up fresh from time-to-time.

This thread is even broader than “Creepy Things Kids Say” in that it essentially encompasses any creepy, unexplained encounter a person has experienced. There are instances of ghosts, both benevolent and malevolent, there are alien encounters, there are even incidents that seem to imply a glitch in time. Some reports are more on the vague side, coloured lights flashing from no apparent source, or sounds that seem to come from nowhere. But others get very specific. In the end, the only thing these stories all have in common is that they were never explained.

Some seem quite nice, like relatives visiting from beyond the grave, while others are so creepy that I had to sleep with the light on for several days after reading them. Nonetheless, I still continue to scroll through this thread from time-to-time, and also highly recommend it for anyone looking for a few chills on a night home alone.

Moving on from Reddit, I’ll make a brief stop on Twitter, with only one account. However, it is an account I enjoy immensely.

Witch Court Reporter

Photo courtesy of Eddie Howell via Unsplash

Photo courtesy of Eddie Howell via Unsplash

“Witch Court Reporter” is an account that ‘live tweets’ proceedings and details surrounding historical witch trials as though they’re happening this minute. It generally involves a lot of misbehaviour and antics from witches, but cats and children are also mentioned quite a bit throughout the tweets.

The tweets seem to cycle through different periods of history, and different trials or incidents. They’re categorized by hashtags used by the account. One of the most recent batches is filed under “#wilts1661”, and actually overs an incident another of this Attic’s Voices covered, which is the Daemon of Tedworth.

The tweets range from the mundane to more horrifying, and while nothing that I’ve noticed is terribly graphic, they do, on a number of occasions, reference torture, illness, and death, so if you’re sensitive to these things, do be aware. It’s an account worth checking out, however. It’s one of the first accounts Voices in the Attic followed on Twitter, and they’re pretty good for a bit of quick historical horror browsing for anyone interested in the witch trials, history, or horror in general.

But of course, no list of social media horror hotspots is quite complete without making its way through YouTube.

MostAmazingTop10

I’m certainly not new to the YouTube community. I’ve been poking my way through different fandoms and music videos and whatnot since I was twelve years old, and the horror community is only my latest stop. That being said, I’ve always had a sort of fascination in the creepy and the unexplained.

MostAmazingTop10 was a channel I stumbled upon by accident. I can’t remember what it was exactly that I was watching at the time, but one of their videos cropped up in the recommended sidebar, and the title was quick to grab my attention. In fact, all of their titles are pretty attention-grabbing for horror fans.

As their channel name suggests, each of their videos is a top 10 list, and they each follow a theme. For instance, some of their videos are: “Top 10 Scary Iceberg Stories”, “Top 10 Mysterious Hidden Tapes That Were Found”, and “Top 10 Scary Islands Nobody Wants to Live On” to name just a few. They cover a range of subjects from creepy theories surrounding popular TV shows, myths and legends, video recordings, etc.

The videos cycle through four different hosts who are, at the current moment, Rebecca Felgate, Landon Dowlatsingh, Ayman Hasan, and Che Durena.

Personally, I like Rebecca’s videos the best. She runs a witty, slightly sarcastic commentary while delivering her lists, and some of her subjects even include creepy things with a comedic twist such as “Top 10 Scary Things You Should Never Say to Siri”, which involves her antagonizing Siri, with rather eerie results.

That being said, each host brings their own flare to the lists they present. Che is the newest, but he grew on me very quickly as he has a very calm, collected tone while telling stories, which somehow makes his stories that much creepier.

All in all, it’s a very creepy channel, with excellent stories and even more excellent storytellers.

Mr. Nightmare

Mr. Nightmare’s logo; Property of Mr. Nightmare

Mr. Nightmare’s logo; Property of Mr. Nightmare

My latest creepy craze is Mr. Nightmare videos. Unlike MostAmazingTop10, Mr. Nightmare is narrated by just one person. It does follow the same vein as the former though, in that it’s a channel that presents lists of themed creepy stories. Mr. Nightmare’s lists aren’t a set length, though, and each video has a random number of stories.

Another difference between the two is that while MostAmazingTop10’s lists are researched and compiled by the hosts, Mr. Nightmare’s lists are composed of stories submitted by channel viewers. Somehow, I feel, this makes the tellings all the more creepy.

Mr. Nightmare delivers his lists one story at a time, just like any other list channel, but instead of simply narrating them, he uses sound effects and creepy music in the background, that really ups the chill-factor. I often have goosebumps while listening to his stories.

Some of his videos include: “3 True Scary Walmart Horror Stories”, “4 Creepy True Uber Stories”, and “3 Creepy True Attic Horror Stories”.

I dare you to give his stories a listen sometime.

KendallRae

Unfortunately, no matter what you believe in when it comes to the paranormal, some stories in this world are heartbreakingly true. Kendall Rae is a YouTuber who highlights true crime videos. Every video is the result of clear research and effort she puts into shedding light on unsolved crime cases such as murders and missing persons. Her hope, as she’s explained in some videos, is to garner new attention for cases, whether they be cold cases or fresh crimes, in the hopes of solving them and either returning a missing person to their family, or bringing a family peace and/ or closure in the face of a horrible tragedy that can’t be undone.

There’s honestly so much to say about Kendall Rae, but first and foremost, she’s a very rare person. She’s someone who clearly has great interest in unsolved cases and mysteries, but rather than simply indulge a morbid fascination, she chose to go one step further with her interest, and found a way to use it to help people. In fact, some of her videos even have second parts after a conclusion has been reached in a case, where she updates viewers on what happened.

Her videos generally range anywhere from 10 to 45 minutes long, but regardless of length, they’re all very captivating. With every one I watch, I find myself sucked into the story she weaves, as she gives a summary of the case, and then presents which theories police and other investigators have gone over and dismissed or focused in on.

Before I continue on in my list, I’d like to drop a quick mention to Thorn, which is a foundation she strongly supports in all her videos that feature missing people. It’s a foundation run by Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore, which aims to save exploited children, and help put an end to sex-trafficking. Please visit the linked website for more information.

With that in mind, I’ll continue through my list, into the territory of other blogs and sites that run in a similar vein to Voices in the Attic!

Atlas Obscura

Atlas Obscura logo; property of Atlas Obscura

Atlas Obscura logo; property of Atlas Obscura

Atlas Obscura is an online magazine and travel company that aims to catalogue all the world’s strangest places to go and sights to see. The coolest part about this site, however, is that its content is user-generated. Anyone who signs up for an account can contribute content to the site or suggest edits for articles already posted. Because of this, it contains vast amounts of information gathered from all around the world.

Categories that can be contributed to are places, food, stories, videos, events, and trips. And once you click through to any of these links on the site, you’re brought to pages and pages of articles about the world’s oddities. Topics covered on Voices in the Attic, can also be found on Atlas Obscura, such as the Alnwick Poison Gardens, and Toronto’s Casa Loma.

For anyone interested in taking a trip and seeing the strangest sights they can find, or even just learning more about the absurdities found in their own backyard, Atlas Obscura is an excellent place to start.

Notebook of Ghosts

Notebook of Ghosts is an online blog run by a woman named Ash. According to the site, it began, much like Voices, as a small project, that grew into something more. For her, it was a personal interest. She kept a notebook when she was younger of all the ghost stories, terminology, and quotes she heard that she wanted to remember.

Now that notebook is a more polished presentation to the world, in the form of Notebook of Ghosts. It serves to educate readers about the world of the paranormal, and encourage discussion about what is real and what isn’t. The site is filled with articles about all manner of paranormal and generally spooky things. So if your thirst for the paranormal is craving more creepy sites to read through, and more stories to uncover, this is a great stop for you.

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These are just a few of the creepy places on the Internet that I like to spend my time, but there are so, so many more where they came from. I encourage you to read through and enjoy these, and even do some digging of your own. Who knows what you might come up with?


In that vein, if you know of any haunts these Voices could hang around, feel free to drop a link or a mention in the comments below. Shameless self-promotion is always welcome, and even strongly encouraged.


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Maggie Kendall

Maggie Kendall spent the first fifteen years of her life furiously avoiding all things horror, but then her friend forced her to watch Paranormal Activity, and there’s been no turning back. She still checks the bathroom mirror for Bloody Mary before getting in the shower.

The Mystery of the Charfield Railway Children

“It’s like watching a train wreck” is a common expression used to refer to the way people can’t take their eyes off a horrible moment, can’t keep themselves from watching tragedy unfold. The details behind such situations hold a source of morbid fascination for many, despite the nightmares they create for those involved.

The Charfield Railway Disaster was a train crash that occurred on October 13th, 1928, in Charfield, Gloucestershire, in the UK. Three trains were involved in this crash: Two goods carrying trains, one of which was empty at the time, and a third train that was carrying both passengers and mail.

Photo courtesy of Ben Brooksbank via Wikimedia Commons

Photo courtesy of Ben Brooksbank via Wikimedia Commons

Aboard the passenger train was conductor Henry Adlington, and fireman Frank Want. These men were the main parties investigated as potentially being responsible for the accident.

Just before the accident, Adlington’s train was on its way into the station, and the empty goods train was on its way out. The second goods train had stopped on the tracks, and was in the midst of being shunted onto the siding.

Henry Button, the signalman at the station, had put up the red signal that indicated for the passenger train to come to a halt in order to allow for the station employees to finish shunting the goods train from the tracks. However, due to foggy weather that morning, Adlington and Want misinterpreted the signal, and instead saw it as green. They continued through the tunnel in the station, slammed into the parked goods train, knocking that train off the track, and taking the second, empty goods train, with them as it attempted to pass through the tunnel in the other direction.

Due to the speed and force of the derailment, part of Adlington’s train broke free and was flung completely clear of the tracks, while the other part—including some of the passenger sections—telescoped, and got wedged up against the bridge.

Button was quick to call for help, only seconds after witnessing the crash, but because the crash was so violent even with his quick action, several victims didn’t make it. The victim count is a subject of debate: witness accounts say that 15 were killed and 23 were injured, but the official report states that 16 were killed, and 41 were injured.

Photo courtesy of Annie Spratt via Unsplash

Photo courtesy of Annie Spratt via Unsplash

None of these details are terribly significant to the part of the story I wish to focus on today, however. What is important to note, is that due to the damage caused by the train crash and the ensuing fire, the victims that died were so unrecognizable to family members, that they could only be identified by their belongings. This being said, two victims—children—remain, to this day, unidentified.

Despite the fact that nobody ever came forward to claim the children, family members of the other victims had pooled funds and efforts, and erected a mass grave. They agreed to include the unidentified children.

The speculation surrounding these children is where this story veers towards the paranormal. There were many theories drummed up for the children at first, such as the thought that they may not be humans at all, but ventriloquist dummies, or that they were in fact small riding jockeys. Ultimately, though, it was concluded that they were children: likely a boy and a girl.

Despite them never being claimed, however, their graves were visited.

Photo courtesy of Lario Tus via Shutterstock

Photo courtesy of Lario Tus via Shutterstock

Over the years, many reports were made of a woman dressed all in black, arriving at and leaving the grave site of the unknown children. She left them flowers at every visit, and visited fairly regularly. But then, she stopped coming, and no one has reported seeing her in decades. It’s believed that she’s dead now, as witnesses described her as an elderly woman at the time. No one ever knew who she was, though, or why she visited the children. Some speculated that she knew more about the accident than anyone else, and that she knew who the children were, but as no one ever spoke to her, nothing could ever be proven.

To make matters even stranger, there also exist many reports by those passing by the site of the trash, of two ghost children. It’s believed that these are the ghosts of the unidentified children who died in the crash, wandering around, waiting for someone to come back and claim them.

Unfortunately, a lot of things will likely remain forever unsolved about the nearly hundred-year-old accident. The woman in black and the children she visited were never identified, and on a more or less supernatural note, depending on what you choose to believe, no one ever figured out why Adlington and Want swore up and down that they saw a green light through the fog, instead of the red one that was proven to have been there.

Perhaps things are just meant to remain a mystery.


For more detailed information on the actual railway disaster, feel free to check out “Charfield Railway Disaster 1928”.


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Maggie Kendall

Maggie Kendall spent the first fifteen years of her life furiously avoiding all things horror, but then her friend forced her to watch Paranormal Activity, and there’s been no turning back. She still checks the bathroom mirror for Bloody Mary before getting in the shower.

Spirits in the Cotswold Hills

This post was first published on SPINE Online, October 17th, 2018.


The city of Bath and its surrounding towns have been host to a wide array of different societies and peoples throughout history—Iron age Britons, Romans, Saxons and Georgians, among others. So, it’s not at all surprising that the area still bears their marks, in architecture or in stories of a more ghostly nature. And if you believe those stories, then you’ll find that most deceased residents have decided to stick around.

The first, and perhaps the most infamous of the stories around Bath, is the legend of Sally in the Woods. So the legend says, Sally was a little girl who was locked in Brown’s Folly, the tall tower standing alone in the woods, and she died there.  Since then, people have reported seeing the apparition of a girl in the roadway, which is pitch black at night without lamps or moonlight coming through the trees overhead. Cars often swerve to evade the phantom and crash into the dark forest. As such, the legend lives on and residents continue to avoid that road at night, for fear that Sally will emerge in their headlights.

Photo courtesy of London Illustrated News. [Theatre Royal, 1888]

Photo courtesy of London Illustrated News. [Theatre Royal, 1888]

Another story, which has made the rounds in the past century, involves the Bath Theatre Royal on Sawclose, built in 1805, and still the most incredible work of Georgian architecture. I cannot personally attest to the accuracy of the following stories, as I did not see or feel or smell anything during my many visits as a child. However, others who have gone to see performances do experience some rather strange phenomena attributed to different spirits.

One of the spirits people report seeing is known to all as ‘the Grey Lady’. She sits in the top left box during shows, leaving behind the distinct smell of jasmine and a terrible depression that affects show-goers for days after. The Grey Lady is said to be an unnamed Victorian actress, who hung herself in the Garrick’s Head Pub next-door to the Theatre when she discovered her husband had murdered her lover.

Of course, we cannot speak about Bath without mentioning the outer towns. And this time, it’s Bradford-on-Avon, the quaint town built on a once thriving textile industry and the site of a few grizzly happenings. Where, in 1532, a local man was burned at the stake for heresy, now there is a zebra-crossing, or a crosswalk for those of you who are of a more North American persuasion. The road crossing is between a pharmacy and a charity shop. Residents and tourists pass over it daily, most without knowing what transpired there five hundred years ago.

Thomas Tropenell, the above mentioned Bradford resident, was arrested for denying the doctrine of transubstantiation—the belief that bread and wine given at the eucharist were quite literally the blood and body of Christ. For doing so, he was burned at the stake upon that very crossing. And sometimes it feels like the fires are still burning. People who cross the road often experience a sudden change in temperature, a sudden unexplainable heat on an otherwise cold winter day. Those who do feel it don’t know what to attribute the heat to, but author Jasper Bark theorizes that the execution of Thomas Tropenell left a permanent mark that can still be felt today.


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Natascha Wood

Say her name three times and she will appear.

Twitter: @oldvvitch

The Ghost of Watson's Mill

When I was a kid, my grandma told me my first ghost story. Maybe this doesn’t sound like such a big deal, but my grandma doesn’t like ghost stories. She doesn’t believe in them, she doesn’t tell them, they just “aren’t her cup of tea” as she’d tell me.

But she told me this one. So, without further ado, here’s a story this Voice has been meaning to tell from the beginning:

On the way out of Ottawa, Canada, there is a small suburb called Manotick. I’ve been there myself countless times growing up. It was where the best dancewear store was, so my mom would take me to buy all of my clothes and shoes. It’s where my mom rushed me to practice from school every day for the two years I was in the Nutcracker. It’s where my mom took me and my grandma for Sunday afternoon lunches when I was a kid.

Photo courtesy of  emkaplin  via Adobe Stock

Photo courtesy of emkaplin via Adobe Stock

It’s a peaceful, sleepy little town, with cute shops and beautiful scenery, The Rideau River runs right through.

But in the very heart of this peaceful, sleepy little suburb, it’s also where Watson’s Mill stands.

Watson’s Mill is not in itself a problem. It was opened in 1860, by Joseph Merrill Currier and Moss Kent Dickinson. They had obtained the water rights to the property just a year previous, and in fact, it’s Dickinson who’s said to have named Manotick in the first place, after the Ojibwa word for ‘long island’ or ‘island in the water’.

It was a powerful mill; according to Rideau-info.com, it “was capable of producing 100 barrels of flour a day and the sawmill could cut up to two million board feet per year.” The problem in this story was a combination of things.

In 1861, on the one year anniversary of the mill’s opening, Joseph Currier brought his new bride, Anne Crosby Currier, in for a tour. They made it all the way up to the attic, while Joseph pointed out all the machinery and inner-workings of the mill to his beloved bride. On their way back down, however, tragedy struck.

Photo courtesy of  bonciutoma  via Adobe Stock

Photo courtesy of bonciutoma via Adobe Stock

Anne was dressed in a flowing dress with a hooped skirt that allowed the dress to drag behind her. It was no doubt a beautiful dress, but an unfortunately disastrous choice to wear inside the mill.

On their way back down from the attic, between the third and second floor, a part of Anne’s dress got caught in one of the Mill’s rotating shafts. The rotating shafts moved too quickly for her to realize in time to pull herself free, and she was yanked against a pillar, dying on impact.

Joseph was so heartbroken that when he left the mill that day, he never looked back. He sold his shares to his partner, and never again returned. Anne, on the other hand, never left.

Over the years, many have reported seeing and hearing things that had no explanation while wandering in and around the Mill. Some reported seeing a woman peering out of a second-floor window, while others swore they heard light footsteps creaking across the upstairs floorboards, even when there was no one up there to make them. What’s more, some visitors to the Mill even report being grabbed or shoved while walking around the upper floors. Many believe it to be Anne, likely trying to warn them away from the same fate she suffered.


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Maggie Kendall

Maggie Kendall spent the first fifteen years of her life furiously avoiding all things horror, but then her friend forced her to watch Paranormal Activity, and there’s been no turning back. She still checks the bathroom mirror for Bloody Mary before getting in the shower.

West Coast Ghosts

British Columbia, on Canada’s West Coast, is known for many things. The Rocky Mountains, for instance, or perhaps the groups of killer whale that populate the ocean around Victoria and Vancouver. But B.C., much like many other places around the world, is also home to its fair share of ghosts.

Today we’ll be addressing what many refer to as the most haunted place in Victoria. It was brought to my attention by a friend of mine who lives out there, and now I’ll be bringing it to your attention in the hopes of giving you a few shivers yourself.

Photo courtesy of Victoria News

Photo courtesy of Victoria News

These days, Bastion Square is a pedestrian mall filled with shops, food, and the hustle and bustle of people going about their daily lives. But the same couldn’t always be said. Many of the buildings that existed back then have been converted into modern uses, but a number of their past residents and memories still remain. It’s believed that there are hardly any buildings in Bastion Square that don’t have at least a ghost or two within their walls.

What was formerly the old Supreme Court building now houses the Maritime Museum of British Columbia, which draws in a high number of tourists on a daily basis. But the visitors that walk these floors are not always of the living variety, and when you take into consideration the building’s history, you come to understand why.

Originally, the grounds upon which the old Supreme Court Building was built were home to the old jailhouse and the city’s first gallows. And to make matters even creepier, quite a few of the men who were hanged at this location still call the ground beneath its foundations their final resting place.The jail was knocked down in 1885, and the old Supreme Court building was taken over by the Maritime Museum in 1965, but some things about the site’s history were never altered. And they continue to walk the streets they once knew.

And it would seem that walking around the places they once lived isn’t the only thing these ghosts do. Visitors to Bastion Square and its various buildings have been known to report several different kinds of hauntings, and those who visit the old Supreme Court building in particular, talk of hearing footsteps running down the stairs (but coming from nowhere), whispers coming from unknown sources, and even some instances of objects moving around the gift shop on their own. Some guests have even reported hands pushing them while on the stairs.

But as I said, the old Supreme Court building is not the only place in Bastion Square that’s haunted, and it’s certainly not the only place where people have claimed to see or hear things that weren’t really there.

Photo courtesy of  Bobenis Rodriguez

Photo courtesy of Bobenis Rodriguez

One of the paths out of Bastion Square is Helmcken Alley, a place that, in the past, ran right by the jailhouse and gallows. Muffled footsteps and dragging chains are among the sounds that have been reported by those walking through here, but perhaps the scariest claim comes from those that insist they’ve seen a prisoner, still dressed in prison uniform and chains, following them through the alley.

It’s believed that at least two of the prisoners killed there were actually innocent, and one of them didn’t even make it to the gallows. Instead, he was murdered by a prison guard who was supposed to be taking him to his execution. It’s believed that the guard grew impatient with the prisoner, and decided to beat him to death instead of waiting for him to be hung. These days, many believe that the same prisoner is now the ghost that follows passersby through Helmcken Alley.

These are just a few of many stories that come out of Bastion Square in Victoria, B.C., so I encourage you to check into it some more if you’re curious. Or even better, maybe take a visit for yourself if you’re nearby. If not, I’ve heard many great things about Canada’s West Coast, and hey, I think a few spooks are the perfect thing to spruce up a trip.


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Maggie Kendall

Maggie Kendall spent the first fifteen years of her life furiously avoiding all things horror, but then her friend forced her to watch Paranormal Activity, and there’s been no turning back. She still checks the bathroom mirror for Bloody Mary before getting in the shower.

Waverly Hills and All Its Ghosts

One of the most haunted places on Earth started off as one of the most innocent. But then, I suppose that’s the way all the best ghost stories begin.

Photo Courtesy of Waverly Hills Historical Society

Photo Courtesy of Waverly Hills Historical Society

In 1883, Major Thomas H. Hays bought the plot of land in Louisville, Kentucky that is now known as Waverly Hills. It was an idyllic, peaceful plot of land, and it was there that Major Hays decided to build a school for his daughters to attend. One of the teachers that he hired for the school was a woman named Lizzie Lee Harris. She was the one who, however unwittingly, gave the fated location its name. She was a fan of a series of books titled “Waverley”, and so she named the school “Waverley School”. Major Hays liked the name so much that he elected to name the entire property “Waverley Hills”. (It’s worth noting that the loss of the second ‘e’ is not a typo, but simply happened to Waverly Hills over the years.)

At the time, tuberculosis had reached epidemic levels in several places. It was a particularly big problem in Kentucky because of the swampy areas which provided the perfect place for bacteria to grow. Because of this, in 1908, the decision to build the sanatorium was made. The other places in the area that had already been treating TB victims were far too small.

At the time, doctors were struggling to combat TB while faced with limited knowledge and no cure. They wanted to treat both the physical and mental health problems patients suffered because of TB, so they made an effort to keep patients’ morale up, and to make them as comfortable as possible. Some of the more pleasant treatments involved lots of fresh air, exposure to ultraviolet light, and access to sunlamps.

Photo Courtesy of Waverly Hills Historical Society.

Photo Courtesy of Waverly Hills Historical Society.

Unfortunately, there were also many more horrifying treatments that would not be acceptable when compared to modern standards. Some procedures were conducted by inserting balloons into patients’ lungs and blowing them up, and operations were done to remove two to three ribs from a patient in order to give their lungs more room to expand. These procedures were excruciating, and, more often than not, resulted in death.

Fortunately, a proper treatment was discovered for TB by the 1930s, and the sanatorium closed due to lack of need.

Between 1962 and 1982, the sanatorium was converted into “Woodhaven Geriatric Center”. It was eventually closed down due to not enough staff and far too many patients. There were also many reports of patient neglect and rumours of experiments being conducted on patients.

There have been many other proposals for conversions of the building over the years, ranging from a prison to a statue of Christ the Redeemer and  then to a set of apartment buildings. All were rejected or shut down due to lack of funding or public outcry.

Waverly Hills Sanatorium is currently privately owned by Charlie and Tina Mattingly, who are attempting to restore the building from its current state of disrepair. They allow paranormal investigators in and tours for the general public, and the money from these goes towards the repair fund.

Charlie Mattingly was originally a skeptic when he bought the place, but has now admitted to his own encounters with various ghosts that are believed by many to haunt the place.

Photo Courtesy of Joe Therasakdhi via Shutterstock

Photo Courtesy of Joe Therasakdhi via Shutterstock

From small children who roam the halls, nurses that have killed themselves, and elderly patients who walk around crying, there is no limit to the dead who just can’t seem to leave this place. For more information on the supernatural residents that exist forever within these walls, I encourage you to check out articles such as “Waverly Hills Haunted Sanitarium” and “Kentucky’s Hospital of the Damned”. I also encourage you to do your own research on the place, but here are a few of the ghosts that have been known to hang around:

Timmy

Timmy is a young boy who roams the halls of the old hospital, looking for something to play with. Some guests have been said to bring him balls, and those balls are then seen floating in the air or rolling down the hall on their own. Sometimes Timmy already has his own ball to play with.

No one is quite sure what his story is, whether he was the child of a patient, or a patient himself, but either way, he now haunts the place. He’s one of the more friendly spirits that exist within Waverly Hills’ walls.

Room 502

Room 502 was a patient room that was linked to a couple of suicides while the hospital was still running. The first was a young nurse who was said to have been pregnant and unmarried, and, unhappy with her life, she hung herself in the room.

Photo Courtesy of Jon Butterworth via Unsplash

Photo Courtesy of Jon Butterworth via Unsplash

Another victim, also a nurse, apparently threw herself from the roof one night, though nobody knows why. She also worked in room 502 while she was still alive.

Some tourists that visit the place while pregnant have reported feeling very uncomfortable in the vicinity of room 502, and a number of other tourists have been filled with the desire to jump off the room while up there looking around, and have had to be talked down.

Woman in Chains

Not a lot is known about the woman in chains except that she looks older, perhaps having been a patient while the hospital was a geriatric center. She walks around the halls with chains around bleeding wrists, and cries out for help. But whenever someone actually moves towards her, she runs away screaming.

The Creeper

The creeper is apparently one of the rarer presences among Waverly Hills’ residents. Like the woman in chains, not a whole lot is known about him beyond the feeling of dread that washes over anyone who gets near him.

He’s rumoured to crawl around on the floor, up the walls, and on the ceilings, and no one really know his past or what his intentions are. Some speculate that he was one of the horribly mistreated patients, and that his trauma in life has warped in death.

These are just a few examples of the apparitions that haunt Waverly Hills, but the current owners plan to turn the building into a hotel that targets those interested in the paranormal. Look out for that in years to come, and for those of you interested in a tour now, check out the Waverly Hills website for more information.


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Maggie Kendall

Maggie Kendall spent the first fifteen years of her life furiously avoiding all things horror, but then her friend forced her to watch Paranormal Activity, and there’s been no turning back. She still checks the bathroom mirror for Bloody Mary before getting in the shower.

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