netflix

What To Watch On Netflix: February 2019

Starting today, Voices In The Attic will be recommending films and shows from Netflix, Prime, and Shudder, so we can spread the good news about the haunting and horrific stuff we’ve been watching. And this is our very first one! So let us begin the rundown of incredible Netflix content!

  1. Train To Busan [2016]

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I couldn't write about content on Netflix without mentioning South Korean zombie movie, Train to Busan, directed Yeon Sang-ho. This one premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016 to some great reviews from both critics and audience members alike, which rarely happens. The plot goes like this: Fund manager Seok-woo boards a train with his young daughter, Su-an, at Seoul Station. The train is heading to the city of Busan, where they intend to visit Su-an’s mother. Unfortunately, as the train leaves, an attendant discovers a woman collapsed by the doors.

The attendant radio’s for help, crucially turning her back to the unresponsive passenger. At that point, the passenger rises from the floor and sets upon the attendant, biting her and transferring a pretty horrifying virus. From that point on, as you would expect, it’s absolute chaos on the train, with survivors separated by cars full of zombies. I almost expected Samuel L. Jackson to show up and yell: “I’ve had it with these motherf#%king zombies on this motherf#%king train!”.


In all seriousness, it’s an incredible movie, with realistic special effects and characters that you can’t help but get invested in. I should also mention that Gong-yoo’s performance as Seok-woo brought me to tears, which is pretty hard to do.

2. The VVitch [2016]

The VVitch, when it came out in 2015, was not just one of the best horror movies to come out that year, but perhaps amongst the greatest horror films of the decade. Not only was The VVitch a box office success, but it also earned critical acclaim for its historic detail, subtle details, and thought-provoking subject matter. The story begins in New England in the 1630s, at which time the British colonies in America are gripped by Puritan fantasticism and witch hysteria. After being banished from the Plymouth colony over a ‘religious dispute’, the family of William and Katherine settle on the edge of a remote forest with their five children: Thomasin, Caleb, Mercy, Jonas, and newborn Samuel. Thomasin goes out to play peekaboo with Samuel, only to have him vanish into thin air while her hands are over her eyes. And they never find him, which causes Katherine to become stricken with grief. William insists that Samuel was taken by a wolf, when in fact it was a horrifying witch.

Anya Taylor-Joy delivers a spell-binding (pun intended) performance as Thomasin, as she bears the brunt of the hysteria from the rest of her family. One can understand why a woman might choose to be a witch in such a tense and oppressive environment, where a family member can turn upon a family member, and women are persecuted without proof. If you love atmospheric, mature horror movies, The VVitch is for you.

3. Errementari: The Blacksmith and The Devil [2017]

In late 2017, one of my personal favourite historical horror films came out, and now that it’s on Netflix, you can watch it too! The film is Errementari: The Blacksmith and the Devil, directed by Paul Urkijo. It’s an adaption of an old Basque folk-tale, about a Blacksmith who keeps a demon, named Sartael, in a cage to avoid paying a debt to Hell. The blacksmith has the situation under control until an orphan girl shows up.

I won’t spoil the rest of the film for you, however, I will say that it’s a perfect combination of horror and fantasy, with some comedy and wonderful redemption stories. And don’t even get me started on the phenomenal artistry that clearly went into the make-up in this film. I would recommend this film to anyone.

4. The Alienist [2018]

One of my favourite television shows to run in 2018 has got to be The Alienist, originally broadcast on the TNT network before being added to Netflix. It’s an adaption of author Caleb Carr’s crime novel The Alienist, the first book of a series. The series is billed as a psychological thriller, set in 1896, New York City. Newly appointed police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt commissions criminal psychologist Dr. Laszlo Kreizler and newspaper illustrator John Moore to investigate the grisly murders of boy prostitutes. They are joined by Sara Howard, Roosevelt’s secretary and the first woman employed by the NYPD. Over the ten gripping episodes of season one, the trio wade through the dark secrets of New York, inching ever closer to the murderer.

I enjoyed this show from start to finish, and I am eagerly anticipating the return of Dakota Fanning as Sara Howard in the second season and sequel, The Angel of Darkness.

5. The Ritual [2017]

Netflix Original The Ritual came out in 2017, and I was quick to watch it the moment it appeared on the site.  As the banner suggests, the premise of this film is a hiking trip in Sweden, undertaken by four woefully under-equipped friends, who are doing the trip in honour of their late best friend, Rob. They embark upon their trip in the Sarek National Park, and all is going well, until Hutch leads them off on a shortcut and they get lost. And then it gets worse, as it often does on hiking trips. The group soon begin to find runes carved on trees, and savaged animals hanging from branches. There is quite a bit of gore in this one, so don’t go into it if you have a weak stomach, but it’s definitely worth a watch.

6. Diablero [2018]

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Here’s another excellent Netflix original, Diablero, an 8-episode Mexican horror series based on the book El Diablo me obligó by Francisco Haghenbeck. The series follows Father Ramiro Ventura, brother and sister demon hunter duo Elvis and Keta Infante, and Nancy Gama, who can become possessed by demons at will. These four make quite the superhero team. And if you are looking for some awesome female main characters, Diablero certainly outdoes CW’s Supernatural, because none of them die. Wow! What a concept! So press the play button and binge the whole thing in one night.


Tell us what spooky and strange stuff you’ve enjoyed on Netflix, or better yet, recommend us movies and shows to review next time!


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Natascha Wood

Say her name three times and she will appear.

Twitter: @oldvvitch

See “You” At Home

Be warned, spoilers for Lifetime’s “You” await.


Social media provides a huge opportunity to form meaningful connections and engage in conversation, allowing an entire world to co-exist and interact within seconds. Most people know how easy it is to stumble upon a person’s Instagram profile and quickly scope out their interests and personal life, finding the cracks in the illusion of privacy.

Often, in the world of Tinder and Grindr, you learn a person far better by scouring their Facebook. It seems like harmless investigation, checking up on a previous relationship and exploring the details of their life.

Except, it really isn’t.

Photo courtesy of mrkornflakes via Shutterstock

Photo courtesy of mrkornflakes via Shutterstock

Stalking has been transformed because of the internet. A person’s entire life can be captured across different social media platforms and exposed to search engines, allowing for someone to easily gain access to their information. Privacy settings often don’t protect anyone either, as it doesn’t take much for a person to create a fake profile under a fake name. Internet stalking has become socially acceptable, a common pastime to engage in. More often it's common to have a second social media account to engage others with, using an alias to provide anonymity to the action.    

Stalking is a relatively new concept. While it has existed for decades now, it only became recognized as a criminal offense in the early 1990s, where it suddenly became illegal to lurk in the bushes outside of a house or harass a person against their wishes. The 21st century provides a digital frontier for stalking, turning it into a huge arena for invasion with data stealing and catfishing.

Welcome to your world, exposed.

Crime fiction is known for taking common fears and transforming them into something so incredibly real. Caroline Kepnes, author of You, took the question of what is harmless obsession and revealed the darkness of our constant need to fill our social media with every detail of our lives.

By inventing a relatively charming narrator, You is constantly focused on describing the dangers of loving just a little too much, and turning something sweet into something much darker. Everything is just a matter of escalation. By learning his love interest’s name, the narrator is able to find and dissect his victim online. He is able to locate her address, her place of employment, and much more, thus transitioning from harmless online stalking to invasive breaking and entering, and eventual murder.

Turned into a Lifetime series in 2018, You does not spare the viewer a single moment. Actor Penn Badgley lends his voice to Joe Goldberg and manages to turn a singular encounter into deadly devotion. Everything is a simple calculation, by learning Beck’s routine, installing himself into her life through run-ins, and demolishing any person who might stand in the way of his obsession.

Most romantic comedies play up the harmlessness of stalking, turning it into a punchline and a quirky characteristic. It creates harmless tension that is swiftly diffused, and does an extreme disservice to the audience. There’s Something About Mary is just one classic example that features the subject as an element to true love, despite the fact that a male lead is using a private investigator to track down a woman from high school. With a tidy ending, the audience is meant to leave under the assumption that stalking can be seen as a grand gesture. Passionate love cannot simply conform to basic privacy.

Friends uses it as a punchline in the episode “The One With the Jam”, letting it wrap the episode up with a few jokes about the situation. Nothing is said about the victim’s anxiety, or how disturbing it was for a stranger to invade her life so thoroughly that she had to change her entire routine. Instead, it is merely an inconvenience set to the tune of a laugh track. One of the more modern uses of stalking as a theme in in literature-turned-movie is Fifty Shades of Grey. The entire series aims to make stalking less of an issue, but more of a symbol of romantic endeavours and protection. Stalking is becoming less of an issue in books and movies, and instead greatly misrepresenting actual victims.

You does not sugarcoat the issue. By throwing the viewer in a front row seat in Joe’s mind, the intentions are not concealed and there is nothing simple about the situation. The victim is nothing more than a victim, stalked and cornered. Lacking any real humour, the show is equipped with a soundtrack to convey some scenes as traditionally romantic scenes. However, it is also matched with the increasingly anxious and obsessive monologue of the narrator. There are no happy endings in the world created by Kepnes.

What is the grand gesture in You? Is it the scene where he murders her casual lover? Or is it the moment where he justifies murdering her best friend, as she was also engaged in similar dangerous stalking behaviours that also targeted Beck? Perhaps it is where he invades the realm of mental health, engaging in counselling sessions with her therapist secretly, to pry out more details of her life.

Many myths surround the topic of stalking and alter our perception of the issue. However, the reality is that 3 in 4 stalking victims are targeted by someone they know. This has a massive impact on the mental health of their victims. Women are far more victimized by the men in their lives than by strangers.

Photo courtesy of AlexCorv via Shutterstock

Photo courtesy of AlexCorv via Shutterstock

Instead of conveying the traditional ‘boys will be boys’ tagline that frequently accompanies literature and media that uses stalking as a punchline, Kepnes creates an unforgettable narrator who is slowly becoming more and more obsessive, drawing his victim into a literal cage to keep her trapped.

Did Kepnes design a handy guide for potential stalkers with her work? Arguably, no. The common methods of stalking are radically normalized in the 21st century, through applications designed for monitoring conversations and constant scouring of social media updates. We’ve become guilty of stalking and obsession far more than even we are aware of. Instead, Kepnes has delivered the dangers and consequences of fanatical love and ‘grand gestures’, revealing the hazards of our digital lives.


Have you ever been catfished? Has your boyfriend’s weird ex-girlfriend ever stalked your instagram? You can tell me all the gory details at @rahel_taller (just, like, don’t actually stalk me and murder my best friend, please?)


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Rachel Small

Rachel Small is not a small person and might be the present day reincarnation of Lizzie Borden. She crawled to life one night after midnight in the basement of a bookstore.